Parkinson’s disease: dietary intake of vitamins C and E is linked to protective effect

  • Hantikainen E & al.
  • Neurology
  • 06/01/2021

  • Susan London
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Individuals in the general population with high dietary intakes of vitamins C and E have lower risks for Parkinson’s disease (PD), even after adjustment for potential confounders.

Why this matters

  • Limited options are available for prevention and treatment of PD.
  • Lifestyle factors amenable to intervention are attractive.

Key results

  • During a mean 17.6-year follow-up, 465 participants developed PD.
  • Multivariate risk (HR, 95% CIs) was lower for top vs bottom tertile of dietary intake for:
    • Vitamin C: 0.68 (0.52-0.89; P for trend=.004).
    • Vitamin E: 0.68 (0.52-0.90; P for trend=.005).
  • A slight additional benefit was detected for participants in the top tertile for both vs bottom tertile for both:
    • HR, 0.62 (95% CI, 0.43-0.89; P for trend=.005).
  • In stratified analysis:
    • Benefit of higher dietary vitamin C intake was limited to participants with BMI ≥25 kg/m2 and low coffee intake.
    • Benefit of higher dietary vitamin E intake was limited to participants with BMI ≥25 kg/m2.
  • No significant associations detected for dietary beta-carotene, dietary total nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity.

Study design

  • Population-based, prospective cohort study of 43,865 men and women ages 18-94 years followed during 1997-2016 (Swedish National March Cohort).
  • Main outcome: Parkinson’s disease.
  • Funding: Swedish Cancer Society; ICA AB; Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.

Limitations

  • Diet was self-reported.
  • Dietary intake assessed once, at baseline.
  • Potential residual, unmeasured confounding.
  • Unknown generalizability.