High vitamin D is linked to better lung function but not less lung disease

  • Ganji V & al.
  • Sci Rep
  • 09/07/2020

  • Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • High serum vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]) is associated with improved lung function biomarkers by spirometry but not with lower prevalence of asthma, emphysema, and chronic bronchitis.
  • Results are from an analysis of a nationally representative sample of almost 12,000 US adults.

Why this matters

  • Randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation are needed, especially of smokers.

Study design

  • 11,983 US adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2007-2012.
  • Primary outcome: results of lung function biomarkers FVC and FEV1.
  • Prevalence of asthma, emphysema, and chronic bronchitis determined by patient self-report.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Serum 25(OH)D levels were directly associated with FVC and FEV1 (P for trend<.001>
  • Highest quartile 25(OH)D was associated with higher FVC and FEV1 vs lowest quartile (each P<.001 on multivariate analysis>
  • Results were similar when stratified by smoking status (nonsmoker vs smoker) and sex (male vs female).
  • No association was found between serum 25(OH)D levels and prevalence of asthma, emphysema, and chronic bronchitis.
  • Limitations

    • Self-report of lung disease.
    • Cross-sectional, observational design.