Heart infections related to drug abuse doubled in 14 years

  • Kadri AN & al.
  • J Am Heart Assoc
  • 01/10/2019

  • Emily Willingham, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
L'accesso ai contenuti di questo sito è riservato agli operatori del settore sanitario italiano L'accesso ai contenuti di questo sito è riservato agli operatori del settore sanitario italiano

Takeaway

  • Heart infections with drug abuse have doubled from about 8% in 2002 to about 16% in 2016.
  • The group most affected is young, poor white men.

Why this matters

  • With the opioid epidemic, drug abuse rates have increased, and along with them the rate of heart infections.
  • Authors: these findings warrant immediate action.

Key results

  • Infective endocarditis (IE) prevalence among people with drug abuse (DA) doubled from 2002 to 2016 (from 8.0% to 16.3%), with an annual percentage change (APC) of 3.5% (95% CI, 3.3%-3.6%) nationally.
  • By region, the APC was highest in the Midwest at 4.9% (95% CI, 4.4%-5.4%) and lowest in the Northeast at 2.4% (95% CI, 2.2%-2.7%).
  • Vs IE patients without DA, those with both IE and DA had:
    • Longer hospital stays: 9 vs 7 days (P<.001 class=""> 
    • Cardiac surgery more often: 7.8% vs 6.2% (P<.001 but class=""> 
    • Lower inpatient mortality: 6.4% vs 9.1% (P<.001>
  • They were more often young, male, and white, with fewer cardiovascular and endocrine comorbidities but greater likelihood of HCV, HIV, liver disease, and alcohol abuse.

Study design

  • Analysis of data for 954,709 IE-related hospitalizations (94,350 [9.9%] with DA).
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Limitations

  • Administrative data; some exclusions potentially led to bias.