ADA 2019—Vitamin D disappoints yet again for T2D


  • Emily Willingham, PhD
  • Conference Reports
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Takeaway

  • In a continuing series of disappointing results, vitamin D offers no benefit in preventing type 2 diabetes (T2D) in at-risk people, based on results from a multicenter randomized, placebo-controlled prevention trial.
  • Supplementation of 4000 IU/day did not best placebo.

Why this matters

  • Based on results of observational studies, vitamin D supplementation was held as potentially protective against several conditions, including T2D and cardiovascular disease, but thus far has largely failed to keep its promise. 
  • More than 84 million in the United States are at risk for developing T2D, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA).
  • Accompanying editorial: results suggest that any benefit is “modest and clearly does not pertain to a vitamin D–sufficient population.”

Key results

  • After median 2.5-year follow-up:
    • With vitamin D: 9.39 diabetes events per 100 person-years.
    • With placebo: 10.66 diabetes events per 100 person-years.
    • HR for diabetes with vitamin D vs placebo: 0.88 (95% CI, 0.75-1.04; P=.12).
    • Adverse events rate did not differ between groups.

Study design

  • 2423 participants were randomly allocated to vitamin D (n=1211) or placebo (n=1212).
  • Mean age was 60.0 years, mean BMI was 32.1, mean HbA1c was 5.9%.
  • Funding: NIH, ADA.

Limitations

  • Some differences between nonadherence participants in the groups.